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Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Golf, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

Golf! Whether you live in or are traveling to Myrtle Beach this is a must. You really need to review this web page for EVERYTHING you need to know about golfing in the area. www.48hourteetimes.com is truly an amazing website. The alphabetical listing of golf courses is at your finger tips, each with a live link where you can read a description of the course, as well as pricing.

The ease of booking your Tee Times 24/7 at your finger tips with course maps. The information is very complete from who designed the course to whether it's tree lined, or straight and long. For fun and more information, tips to improve your game and or just to keep you informed read and enjoy the Golf Blog also available to you with the click of your mouse.

Are you needing to stick to a budget? Are you wanting a package deal of accommodations as well as golf times? Look no further, 48 Hour Tee Times is your source. You can book at the last minute, or plan ahead. Plug in information about when you plan to travel, how many golfers will be playing, even how much per golfer you want to pay and let them plan your day. AND it's FREE!! The only thing they don't do for you is pack your bag, so grab your suitcase. You pack and let them do the rest for you. Accommodations with golf, golf by itself and dinner recommendations truly one stop shopping.

Enjoy!
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Friday, June 25, 2010

Stanley at the Masonic Museum

Masonic MuseumMason's have a long history of doing good, of helping people through a variety of different charities. This building was built back in 1820 which makes it almost 200 years old. This lodge is the oldest continuous lodge in existence in the State of Ohio; and the oldest lodge building west of The Allegheny.
New England Lodge SingHere's another view of the blue door with New England style sign indicting it's New England Lodge #4 F & AM, and that it was chartered way way back in 1803. That's the same year Ohio became a state. F & AM means Free and Accepted Masons. Their logo is a square and compass. Masons have 2 million members here in the United States with a total of 5 million members across England, Scotland, and Ireland. They are a fraternal group.

Most of you have probably attended a parade where Shriners wore what might appear to be funny hats and rode around in fun little cars. There is much more to the organization than that. One of the biggest charities supported by Shriners is the 22 Shriners Hospital's across the US. All Shriners must first be a Mason, and after they move up earn the right to be a Shriner. Not all Masons are Shriners however.

The special Olympics is another worthy charity supported by The Masons.

Activities to help the kids remember what they learned here would be purchase a compass and small plastic square. They could make pictures using it to color. Most drug stores and office supply stores have these items pretty reasonably priced. Take paper and make and decorate a Shriners Hat.

Until next Friday July 2, Flat Stanley Out.

Remember if you've missed any of the outings you can catch up here:



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Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Shook Cemetery, Port Clinton Ohio

Shook Cemetery on East harbor Road, on the north side of St. Ft #163 about 1 mile East of Chrisy Chapel Road. This pretty little historic cemetery is in Ottowa County in Port Clinton. A quick scan of the cemetery shows stones dating back as far as 1830.
We didn't spend much time at this little cemetery as it was getting dusk, it was starting to rain and the mosquitoes were out in force. But a quick look indicates the little cemetery is well cared for which always makes me feel good. It was mowed, and some of the stones had been repaired. No doubt in previous years the cemetery suffered as do many historic cemetery from time, the elements, and sadly vandalism. Some stones are quite readable, some only partially, and some not at all. This stone honor John Bennett who was in 1842 and died in 1863. How nice he has a GAR star and flag to honor his service in the Civil War.
Harriett M. wife of Jacob Brown born in July of 1807 and died in September of 1852. She was born a few years after Ohio became a state and died before The Civil War at the age of 45.
A general view with stones around a large tree gives you a feel for the serenity.
Mary French's stone really isn't readable, but through some research and process of elimination I believe this is her stone. A transcription of the little cemetery was located on line and this seems to match.

I often like to walk through an old cemetery to see how different the names are, to see how old the dates are and to formulate a story in my mind. Sometimes I'm able to do some research and sometimes not. Many of the stones here belong to the Shook Family, and so one would assume this land was probably their farm. Perhaps this cemetery grew from a family burial ground to a local one. Christy Chapel road is close by, perhaps this was at one time connected to an area church.

Even though when we travel we are tourist, we are touring where others live....where people made their mark. I enjoy seeing a bit of the real world, the day to day even while on vacation. I highly recommend you all give it a try.
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Sunday, June 20, 2010

Lyme Village, Ohio

poster of Victoria Christmas
On the way to Lake Erie my sisters and I were surprised to find Lyme Village on route 4. We looked to the side of the road and saw a cluster of log cabins and got pretty excited. We pulled in to see what we could see. Lyme Village at 5001 St Rt 4 is just outside Bellevue Ohio. It's a non profit strictly run by volunteers re-created village. (poster shows scenes from the village)

In the center of the village is a 2nd Empire Victoria Home (shown in the center of the above poster) built between 1880-1882. This mansion belonged to John Wright. There are barns, log houses, a Detteram Log Church, an 1836 Greek Rivival style house, and even a one room school house. I purchased a few items at the darling gift shop.sun bonnetsingle tea pot and cupI love these single tea pots that include a cup.
single tea pot set*my finger is showing where the pot sits on top of the cup.

The buildings all predict life in The Firelands from 1800 to early 1900's. You can take guided tour to learn what life was like for our early settlers. The tours cost $8.00 and run from 11 am to 4 pm Tuesday through Sat; and special summer Sunday hours from 12-4. There are many special events throughout the year such as Native American Days, Pioneer Days, Victorian Dinners during the Christmas Holidays and more.

I noticed this quote, "Preserving Yesterday for Tomorrow" found it to be very meaningful, and think it fits many of our countries treasures.

The Greek Rivival house belonged to John Seymour and was an important stop along the underground railroad for many escaped slaves as they made they way to Canada to freedom. The one room school house was built in the 1860's and was still being used until 1935 in Oxford township in Erie County Ohio. The school house was moved to the village in 1991.

Many of the buildings were dismantled and moved from other areas in the state to this village in order to preserve them.

Sadly our time was short and we were traveling on what we later learned was the edge of a tornado; so we did not get to take the tour. Though I do intend on returning when I'll be able to spend time and take the tour. I suggest you all put this on your list of things to do with the family. Something here for everyone.

And for fun, look carefully when you exist. The kids will enjoy this LARGE ceramic dog in the yard across the street.
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Friday, June 18, 2010

Breath Easy With Flat Stanley



Breathing is something everyone does, something we don't think about really. But, that was not always the case. Tuberculosis also called The White Plague killed 1 out of 9 people just in Columbus Ohio alone in the early 1900's. Think of 9 people you know, 1 in nine died because of a breathing problem.

Flat Stanley came across this Ohio State Historical Sign at 1520 Old Henderson. After reading both sides of the signs and researching further he learned what a remarkable woman Carrie Nelson Black was.

In 1898 Carrie started Instructive District Nurses Association, in 1911 she started Mother's Day in Ohio, in 1913 she help start an open air school on Neil Avenue. The open air school was open to children who lived in a home where one or more people were afflicted with TB. In 1921 she started the Countries first FREE Cancer Clinic!

She was a woman before her time, always caring for others, lobbying for better public health. She spent 30 years as President and CEO of The Breathing Society (formerly known as The TB Society) which she founded in 1906.

A Tuberculosis dispensary located at 40 S. Third Street in Columbus provided care for those without funds to care for themselves. She taught many that good medical care, proper nuitrition and clean air was a right that should be afforded to all.

Columbus became smoke free in 2005. Sadly, there are still areas in our country who've not yet caught up to that important step of protecting one's right to breath clean fresh air. There are still places in the country that allow smoking in public buildings.

The Breathing Association continues Carrie's legacy by providing education, and financial assistance to those in need to protect everyone's right of Public Health.

Carrie was the wife of Samuel L. Black a Probate Judge and Major of Columbus and mother of 3. Carrie and her husband Samuel Luccock Black are buried in Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus, Ohio.

So Stanley has a message for all, stop smoking if you smoke and don't start the habit. Encourage all you love to stop and or not to start as well.

An activity to help explain the importance of breathing could be blowing bubbles. If one can't blow out due to a breathing problem, one can't enjoy the fun of blowing bubbles. Then get a whistle and let the kids blow. Blowing a whistle is also blowing out. Kids love to blow whistle and will remember this because of the activity. Depending on the age of your child have them chew gum (a cool minty type). Then remove the gum and have them suck in....the opposite of blowing out; but still shows the importance of breathing. When they suck in, they'll feel the coolness.

Do you have a child in sports? Talk about how differently they breath when exercising, when their heart is beating harder. Talk about how much harder it is to breath in certain weather conditions. These things are more visual and promote understanding.

Haven't left you with a word puzzle in a while, so here's one with 20 words related to what Stanley learned.

Breathing Words



X I G T Q I S X E J H G H S Q D H O R G
O E T I H W O I H N N K T L G P X E L Q
G R N B U N U I S I L Q L N R N H D P V
K E A Z E S W H H O M Q A C F T U C P U
R L C L Q R M T G I L S E R O C R L Z C
X C S I K R A O M J M U H M I I N P U K
Z O L G L E X F K O I C C D A Y Z I E I
N K G I R B G S K I M L Y R P I Y K W G
G I Y B N U U E L B N O R Z E Q F T C L
O Z Y K F I R P C L J G A I T B B K A A
Y Q O L N X C B A A L E S E B R U C R E
K Y R P Z A A P D C H I N M P Y I T R W
K I X T A Y Q R Z K Z T E Z M Q P B I E
A N V L W T R N X U L X P X U R V K E E
W H E E Z I N G K J C U S C A N C E R R
A R D I Y Q M V C J S E I E U G A L P F
D G I L F T C X R W M S D O O N K N Z S
X Z W J W M S E W J L V K R E C P F J E
N B A C S C L M R Y V S B C T Y R K V Y
A N D O C X E V F B T J D S O T U Q L I

AIR
BLACK
BREATHING
CANCER
CARRIE
CLINIC
DAY
DISPENSARY
FREE
HEALTH
LUNGS
MOTHER
NELSON
PLAGUE
PUBLIC
SMOKE
SMOKING
TUBERCULOSIS
WHEEZING
WHITE
You should be able to cut and paste the puzzle in order to print it. Until next time, Friday June 25th, Flat Stanley Out.

In case you've missed any of Stanley's Friday Fun, you can catch up here:



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Wednesday, June 16, 2010

Mon Ami Winery, Port Clinton Ohio

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Mon Ami winery has changed hands many times. It was originally Catawba Island Wine Company which was first organized way back in 1872 by a group of Islanders who grew grapes, though most principally the 3 families were: The Ellithorpe, Neals, and Laudy's. They made 130,000 gallons of wine. (pictured above Me, Julie, & Jan)

In 1937 the winery was purchased by Mon Ami Champagne Co. when they moved from Sandusky after the 18th amendment was repealed. At that time 55 men produced 400,000 to 500,.000 bottles of champagne and wine a year.
(picture from parking lot looking towards outside eating area)
overviewIn 1945, after a terrible fire gutted much of the winery the first floor restaurant was added.

In 1956 it once again changed hands. It was purchased by Norman Mantey, another Sandusky wine grower who's family had been in the business since the 1800's.
The Meier's Wine Cellars purchased Mon Ami in 1980, making it the largest producer in the state at 40-50-,000 gallons of wine.

Mon Ami menugreen birdgreen bird
(a couple brought their pet with them who let me get a photo)
Another purchase took place in 2000, when renovations of the main dining room, the chalet were done as well as a complete over haul of the kitchen. Additionally, a new gift shop was built. Throughout it's many changes of ownership it has maintained the name of Mon Ami.

outside bar Mon Amipicnic area Mon Ami(outside bar area and picnic area beyond)

Today Mon Ami attracts visitors from all over to it's wine tasting, tours, and restaurant. Wine tasting is offered at $1.00 a taste in a relax and fun tasting room that adjoins the gift shop. You can dine in or out; and be entertained on Friday and Sat with live performances. Happy hour runs from 4-7 pm Monday through Friday. A special Sunday Brunch is available. Banquets and weddings in this beautiful historic setting are also available.


Romania server at the wine tastinggirls tasting wine

We had a ball and enjoyed our lunch outside followed by wine tasting and I highly recommend it. .

bird on shouldersisters at lunch at Mon Ami



yummy brieWhen you go, the baked brie is a must!

Monday, June 14, 2010

River to Lake Freedom Trail, Ohio

underground railroad historical markerThe River to Lake Freedom Trail follows US Route 23 from Portsmouth Ohio along The Ohio River through Central Ohio, North of Marion County it follows State Route 4 to Sandusky and onto Lake Erie. This was one of the most frequently used corridors of the underground railroad. This historical sign is just south of Marion on Route 23 at a rest stop. Proving yet once again the need to keep one's open to see all there is to see. That travel and what we can learn from travel can be right in front of our eyes. Who knew a bathroom break could be so enlightening?

The flip side of this historical marker tells a story about Bill Anderson, or Bill Mitchell and slavery. I've left the picture large, and you can go larger still by clicking so you can read the account of his running away, being found out, tried, and freed. Wonderful to read about the Quakers and his ultimate escape to Canada through help of many.

Bill Anderson historic markerAs I read this, I felt both good and bad. I felt good to read he had escaped, I felt good to read people had helped him, I felt bad for what he was forced to endue and the narrow mindedness of the slave owners who came looking for him. I grew up in Marion and so also felt a since of pride that people in my former community had done the right thing.

I tried to find some more information about Bill and did find this information in wikipedia.
A Bill Anderson was born in June of 1811 the son of free Black Susan and Slave Black Lewis Anderson. There's a narrative written by Bill Anderson that was published in The Chicago papers long ago. This narrative indicates Bill was 24 years a slave, sold 8 times, jailed 60 times, and whipped 300 times. It goes onto say when his father Lewis died his own mother Susan sold him into slavery to Mr. Vance a neighbor of Mr. Shelton's who owned Lewis Anderson. There are accounts of his reading on the sly, getting caught and being whipped for doing so. There are additional accounts that he also practiced writing on the sly until caught. He was kidnapped by another plantation owner and sold in a slave market after being tied to 60 or 70 other slaves and marched across the state of Tennessee. He was jailed for helping other slaves in Kentucky. This narrative goes onto describe the plan Bill had to abolish slavery that sounded very similar to The American Indians on Reservations. I don't know if the Bill on the plague and the Bill in the narrative are the same, as I didn't see a reference made about escaping to Canada. No matter, both stories cause us to stop and pause. We must pause and remember the wrongs committed to assure they are never repeated.

I'll leave here the link where I read the 2nd account listed so you can read in more detail and come to your own conclusions.
is this the same man?

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Saturday, June 12, 2010

Signs and Flat Stanley, Worthington Ohio

Silly Stanley, it's Saturday not Friday, so this I guess will be less fun? The post scheduled for yesterday's Friday Fun with Flat Stanley got deleted I guess, so this will be a message of safety from Stanley about signs on Saturday. But, the Friday Fun will return this Friday June 18th. Stanley observed this sign while on a recent photo session and wanted to share with you, but couldn't get his picture taken by the sign because it was up to high on the building. Do you know what this is? Do your children know what this is? This particular sign is posted at post office in Worthington Ohio. If you click to enlarge the picture I think you can see capacity 52.

fall out shelter sign

According to Wikipedia, a fallout shelter is an enclosed space specially designed to protect occupants from radioactive debris or fallout resulting from a nuclear explosion. Many such shelters were constructed as civil defense measures during the Cold War.

During a nuclear explosion, matter vaporized in the resulting fireball is exposed to neutrons from the explosion, absorbs them, and becomes radioactive. When this material condenses in the rain, it forms dust and light sandy materials that resembles ground pumice. The fallout emits alpha and beta particles, as well as gamma rays. Much of this highly radioactive material then falls to earth, subjecting anything within the line of sight to radiation, a significant hazard. A fallout shelter is designed to allow its occupants to minimize exposure to harmful fallout until radioactivity has decayed to a safer level.

Now if you're my age and grew up during the Cold War, these signs mean a great deal to you. Do you remember the film clip, "Duck and Cover"? Do you remember practicing drills in school? Kids today don't do that at all. They do practice fire drills. But, do the kids know why we hear a siren on Wednesday at exactly 12 noon?

Now besides these lyrics:

Sign Sign everywhere a sign
Blocking out the scenery breaking my mind
Do this, don't do that, can't you read the sign

running around in my mind it occurs to me there are signs that kids do need to know about. It's summer, they'll be out and about more then usual. Do they know where the closest block parent lives? Do they know what sign to look for? Do they know how to get help and from whom if you're not around? That was such a big part of the school practice, what to do if you weren't with an adult. The importance of staying calm in an emergency.

The fall out shelter program began in earnest in 1961 with shelters in churches, schools, and other public buildings. What I found interesting after seeing this sign (which peaked my interest); is that Switzerland had a huge network of fallout shelters stocked with essentials enough for the entire population for a full 2 years after an attack back in the Cold War. Other countries too had vast underground networks far different than what we had/have here in The States.

Does your family have a plan for emergencies? Be they a tornado, a fire etc? This seemed like a good reminder to me that being prepared is a good way to be safe.

Thinking of safety while traveling, show the kids were the stairs are, talk about sirens, talk about evacuating calmly should something happen while you're in a hotel in your summer travels.

In case you've missed any of Stanley's Friday Fun, you can catch up here:


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Wednesday, June 9, 2010

Marblehead Lighthouse, Lake Erie, Ohio

Click arrow to start slide show


video

The day after the tornado's hit Northern Ohio the sky was beautiful blue and the sun shone brightly. Though the air was cool, the sun was warm. Marblehead Lighthouse was built in 1821 with a 50 foot beacon. In 1903 15 additional feet were added making it's beacon 65 feet. The Marblehead Lighthouse was built by William Kelley from limestone and became an Ohio State Park in 1998.

Here on Lake Erie it attracts visitors from all over. Lake Erie is the 12th largest freshwater lake in The World, is the most shallow of the 5 Great Lakes, measures 210 miles long, 57 miles wide and has approximately 871 miles of shore land to enjoy. That's a lot to explore folks.

Marblehead Lighthouse is the oldest continuously operated lighthouse in The Great Lakes, and one of the most photographed scene's in the area. Come spend the day walking the shoreline with views of Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay, Kelleys Island, and South Bass Island. You can even see the rides at Cedar Point from your vantage point here at Marblehead Lighthouse State Park.

There's picnic facilities for families of all ages to enjoy. On week days and the 2nd Saturday of the month you can take a guided tour of the lighthouse.

Though I've stopped here at Marblehead Lighthouse multiple times, I've not yet been able to take the tour; so it's still on my list of things to do while touring and enjoying The Port Clinton area.

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Monday, June 7, 2010

Port Clinton, Ohio

The list of things to see and do in and around Port Clinton are numerous and so this post will be part I.

Port Clinton lies on the north coast of Lake Erie in Ottawa County and is known as, the "Walleye Capital of the World". So there is your first clue about what to do while in Port Clinton. Fishing! Everywhere you look you see people fishing. Some fish from shore, others from boardwalk's and bridges, and many from boats. Lots of marina's to dock your boat, or to enjoy a stroll to take in the sites.

Camping, swimming, shopping, and site-seeing are a few more of the items on the large list of things to see and do.

DeWitt Clinton a New York Stateman proposed building a canal from the mouth of The Portage River in Sandusky County to The Ohio River in Cincinnati. 1212 acres of land were purchased, and a surveyor selected. Several years later in 1827 the selected surveyor, General Lytle's stepson bought the same 1212 acres for a mere $1,000.00 and began platting the town of Port Clinton. The town was named in honor of DeWitt Clinton known as The Father of The Erie Canal; though he died just 4 months prior to the completion of the platting. Ultimately, the canal project was a failure due to insufficient water flow. Port Clinton grew despite the failed canal project. In 1999 the downtown revitalization of Port Clinton began giving all who visit a wide range of activities to enjoy.

Those who know me, know I am NOT a shopper. Not in the traditional since anyway. But, give me a good yarn shop.........I could spend all day fingering the yarn making purchases and chatting.
sheep, before yarnfeed the animalsfabulous yarn shopfiber

fiber, stash and more

Just For Ewe is not just any yarn shop! The shop is owned by Christi someone you've got to meet. Fiber for Knitting, Crocheting, Spinning, Weaving and more. This is MUST stop even for those among you who don't knit or crochet etc. There are 7 shops here all quaint, cute and fun. Buy some homemade goodies to eat, hand crafted purses, shoes or beautiful jewelery. And if that doesn't entice you come and feed the animals!

Through a wonderful conversation with Christi she donated yarn to help me with warming the homeless. I'll get it photographed so please check it out, over on Bridge and Beyond. She gifted Julie with an extra goodie because it was her birthday. We left the shop after a hug, the warmth of finding a new friend made the day special.

I do plan to return when I can spend more time.

You can find Christi at 9523 East Harbor Road (Route 163), Lakeside/Marblehead, Ohio 43440 right on the way to the famous Marblehead Lighthouse. Go, visit and shop...tell her Sandy sent ya.


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